Startup Tactics With Bla Bla Foods Founder Louise Fritjofsson

Louise Fritjoffson-CoverArt.jpg

A lot of people call themselves serial entrepreneurs, but with Louise Fritjofsson, that title seems to actually be legit. After starting an the e-commerce business Popsox, the ad-tech business Ad Profit, and the health- and training app Vint, Louise is now launching a brand of plant based baby food in the US called Bla Bla Foods. HOWEVER, the first AMAZING interview was never caught on tape after Walter forgot to hit record, so this episode is a backup version we recorded afterwards. So, while the sound is not perfect and our performances as hosts questionable, Louise still provides so much value in this interview that you don't want to miss it. Check it out and see for yourselves. :)

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Transcript

Note: This is an auto-generated transcript that will butcher words and names sometimes (Our favorite is when our guest Johannes Cullberg became “Your Hummus Cool Bye”). The format is not optimized for reading, but for searching for specific segments. Hence the timestamps etc. Happy searching!

00:00

oh my god I'm sorry this this is one of

00:10

those times where you like that this

00:12

really happened we we had this amazing

00:16

interview with Louise Fritjofsson serial

00:19

entrepreneur yeah yeah don't rub it in

00:22

though I know I forgot to hit the record

00:24

button sorry we've recorded for 55

00:27

minutes and I'm just like this is such

00:30

an amazing episode it was really good we

00:33

like high-five over the table in the

00:37

studio and we just felt but this is

00:39

kick-ass and Walter says there's

00:42

something wrong with the record I had to

00:46

take my t-shirt off yeah so hot I was

00:49

like oh no but what did we do a big

00:53

thanks to Louise for Thompson who was

00:56

very cool with this and we actually made

00:59

a new recording of this amazing episode

01:02

where we talk about a lot of interesting

01:05

stuff for entrepreneurs a lot of advice

01:06

one of my favorite parts was the CEO

01:11

transplant and what is a CEO transplant

01:15

John did you come up with that term no I

01:16

actually I stole it from my mentor Keith

01:19

cool what is it it's changing CEO in an

01:22

entrepreneurial driven company where the

01:24

CEO and the the founder is a very

01:27

important person yeah and we got some

01:29

really good advice on that because

01:30

louise has done that I think twice and

01:33

one time less successfully and one time

01:36

more successfully right no not almost

01:38

the first time she was first not

01:41

successful but she kept the same CEO and

01:44

they like had to hit the

01:47

control-alt-delete all right yeah reboot

01:50

and that then it came out amazing right

01:52

yeah yeah what did you like about the

01:54

episode I think that I really loved the

01:57

part where she talks about how she tries

01:59

out ideas on a real audience being

02:02

humble to your idea that you don't quite

02:04

know how it's gonna be received and

02:06

trying that out on a real audience for

02:08

like a hundred bucks you know she

02:10

started with like 20 business ideas

02:12

did live testing came down to three

02:15

ideas put three months of testing into

02:18

each idea and then picking your business

02:20

yeah and then and then starting to

02:22

invest time and money in it and that's

02:24

kind of the opposite of what we've done

02:26

here right with what's in the water yeah

02:28

we just we had a different philosophy

02:30

just do it do it and pour as much money

02:33

in time as you can into it so and pray

02:36

yeah

02:37

so actually we had part of our prayers

02:40

answered this week we got featured on

02:43

the main part of iTunes on what is

02:48

called featured podcast that was cool

02:49

yeah we it was amazing for us to just to

02:54

see that this week we got picked out by

02:56

Apple as the featured podcast of the

02:58

week and that's a great feeling for us

03:01

like five six weeks into podcasting yes

03:03

so now that was that was great and we we

03:06

need to celebrate that yeah and we

03:09

celebrated with this amazing episode

03:12

with Louise for Johnson we hope you

03:14

liked it as much as we do because we

03:16

worked really hard and we recorded it

03:19

twice for your work site and once and

03:22

the final time we had less time so so

03:26

our voice is part of our voices are

03:28

cutting from the first episode because

03:30

we have that sound and her her sound is

03:33

from the final episode anyway we think

03:36

you're gonna love it

03:37

so please listen and also hit the

03:39

subscribe button on the podcast and rate

03:42

it because that helps us thank you

03:45

[Music]

03:50

[Applause]

03:53

[Music]

03:58

[Applause]

04:00

[Music]

04:08

hello hello and welcome

04:12

who is Louise Richardson or free Jobson

04:17

or how do you actually say it in English

04:20

so since the rolling R is very difficult

04:23

here in the US I'm trying to use like a

04:25

strong J instead so we're going for four

04:27

for Dawson I think what just seems to

04:30

resonate better yeah I mean who doesn't

04:32

want a strong last names I love that I

04:34

wonder what I would be nestling nestling

04:37

that's that's not strong so great to

04:40

have you in the podcast we yeah this is

04:43

our second attempt this time we've got

04:45

to try to press record and let's see if

04:47

we can actually get it on tape as well

04:49

fantastic

04:50

I'm excited about getting it recorded

04:52

this time we had this amazing

04:56

conversation and have right now we have

04:59

the deja vu feeling of doing it all over

05:01

so can you tell us a little bit about

05:06

your early career what did you what did

05:10

you do before you became an entrepreneur

05:12

and how did you become an entrepreneur

05:14

yeah so I'm I'm from Stockholm Sweden I

05:18

grew up outside of Stockholm in Bulgaria

05:21

sort of like the ghettos to be honest I

05:24

take pride in back yeah I am as most

05:29

like I don't know young people in Sweden

05:31

too I went out traveling after gym

05:35

Nauset which is I assume like high

05:37

school and I was supposed to come back

05:43

and go to the University and get my

05:45

proper studies done but I ended up

05:48

working at a start-up for a few months

05:51

and at this point of time and this is

05:53

like more than 12 years ago this this it

05:56

was not cool working for a start-up they

05:58

were not even called startups they were

06:00

just small companies it was super sad he

06:03

did not have paid lunches or fancy

06:05

titles or any of the things that we

06:08

associate with working at a start-up

06:10

today it was just the hard proper grind

06:14

but it was very inspiring to me at such

06:16

a young age I was 18 may be going into

06:20

19 and being amongst people that were

06:22

trying to build companies and do

06:24

something for themselves and part of me

06:27

was just like instead of working here

06:29

for like minimum amount wage and and

06:32

busting my ass I might as well do this

06:36

for myself and get the upside if I

06:38

managed to be successful and at the same

06:42

time I had the fortune of being

06:44

introduced and getting to know a person

06:47

who believed in me and had a company

06:51

that they had put on pause that

06:53

resonated with me a ton it was selling

06:55

branded hosiery and stockings on Martin

06:58

no it was like before before its time

07:03

people were still you know thinking me

07:05

anything you couldn't buy things online

07:07

giving you a credit card was unsafe and

07:10

who knew the package would arrive and so

07:12

forth but I launched this website

07:14

selling subscription packages on branded

07:19

hosiery and stockings because I knew

07:21

there was only one place in Stockholm

07:23

where you could go and get these and I

07:25

had worked there when I was younger so I

07:28

knew that people would come by by every

07:30

week to buy the same hosiery so at the

07:32

age of 19 I started my first company was

07:34

an e-commerce company I ran that for two

07:37

years and it was picked up by aliens so

07:42

very small acquisition but it's still

07:44

like a good experience and again it's

07:46

it's a it's funny to think it's not that

07:48

long ago but like they were doing postal

07:51

order at that point well we were just

07:55

like thinking about like doing

07:56

e-commerce so it was a very interesting

08:00

first ride and from there I started a

08:02

media company named ad profit that

08:05

profit is now in five countries

08:08

I ran as a seal drink five years and

08:11

then left hired L an external or like a

08:14

new CEO and Gustavus became an amazing

08:17

guy still CEO a prophet and the Prophet

08:19

is doing better than ever and I went

08:23

from there to start Vint which initially

08:25

was a mark

08:26

for fitness and we we had to go through

08:28

painful and and rough pivots to being a

08:32

SAS company so software as a service

08:34

company and that if the company I moved

08:36

to the US with about five years ago and

08:40

yeah I mean I left that company like a

08:43

year ago as a CEO and recently made my

08:46

first leap into the food industry with

08:49

bla bla foods bla bla foods produce and

08:52

make plant-based nutrition with a

08:54

Scandinavian twist and angle here in the

08:57

States

08:57

we're basically aiming to be a lifestyle

08:59

brand providing plant-based and

09:01

sustainable products for young families

09:03

so if we if we dive into add profit

09:08

which i think is in a two things that

09:11

are really interesting about that

09:12

journey the first thing is that you you

09:17

moved on why did you move on and the

09:19

second thing is to deep dive a little

09:22

bit into how did you manage to put a new

09:25

CEO in place what was the major

09:27

learnings about that so I think many of

09:31

the listeners know that our

09:33

entrepreneurs like being an entrepreneur

09:35

is emotionally draining it is such a

09:38

commitment and relationship you're like

09:40

living and breathing with the company it

09:43

just says like your relationship with

09:45

your partner you know one of the two and

09:50

that relationship can change you go

09:52

through you've all you grow up and you

09:54

understand more of yourself and that I

09:56

grew up with that profit I started that

09:58

company at the age of twenty-one and I

10:01

left houses CEO at the age of 26 and I'm

10:04

still terrible and very much involved in

10:06

the business and love the business and

10:09

the people in it but at the age of 25 I

10:12

started having really big problems with

10:15

like understanding the long term vision

10:18

and being excited about the vision for a

10:20

profit

10:21

me as a person had grown ups who wanting

10:24

to do basically I had grown up to

10:27

wanting to have a different type of

10:29

impact in the world than what I could

10:30

create with that profit and I had a year

10:34

where I was not a great CEO for that

10:36

business I tried to take the business

10:38

into

10:40

you know directions that is not it

10:42

wasn't meant for ad profit i profit is a

10:44

beautiful business assets and I tried to

10:47

make it something else sort of fit what

10:49

I wanted to do with my life so that was

10:53

a rather painful year of trying to just

10:56

look like you're trying to save your

10:58

relationship with your partner I went

11:00

through that with my business and at the

11:02

end I just realized I'm not supposed to

11:04

be running this as a full-time CEO

11:06

anymore we've grown apart even though

11:09

there's so much more like love and

11:11

understanding and I want to be you know

11:13

part of the business and supportive of

11:15

it it was just time for someone else to

11:18

step in and what was your main learnings

11:21

about that personally

11:23

making that decision and moving on to a

11:26

different business was it a difficult

11:29

decision and how did it make you feel in

11:33

that process so um when I talk about

11:37

this many people scuff and like shrug

11:39

their shoulders and think it's stupid

11:41

because who has a life crisis at the age

11:45

of 25 but I did I had a serious life

11:48

crisis at the age of 25 and a huge part

11:51

of it was that I I found myself in a

11:54

position again we're like I wanted to do

11:56

something and build something

11:58

differently that maybe I was able and

12:00

capable to do even though it was my own

12:02

company within that road and I had such

12:06

great grand ideas of one of what I

12:08

wanted to accomplish and I felt like I

12:10

was lagging and I you know I wasn't

12:12

hitting my goals and so forth we're just

12:15

not what I had seen in front of were

12:17

like ambitions so that was a part of it

12:21

and then you know before you make the

12:24

decision to leave again like though I

12:26

think the worst part of this journey was

12:30

not great CEO before I decided to eat I

12:33

think all founder founding CEOs the

12:36

decide today will have that period of

12:38

time where they suck as a CEO because

12:41

losing is so hard and I think you need

12:43

to suck to really understand that it's

12:45

time to go but that also means that when

12:48

you're ready you are so ready I was so

12:52

ready to leave a CEO I was completely at

12:56

peace with sort of how the process what

12:58

what would happen I am again so happy to

13:02

have found Costa who's an amazing guy

13:04

and the perfect CEO for this business I

13:06

was so afraid to to not give the new CEO

13:12

space and not give him you know his own

13:15

you know space and responsibility to do

13:18

what he wanted that I that I sort of

13:19

jump ship way too fast and he was left

13:23

without without much guidance or support

13:26

so we needed to come back from that and

13:28

I needed to start being more involved to

13:32

find that balance and that that took a

13:35

took a while and I actually did a new

13:38

CEO transition with Vince where the

13:40

transition has been waiting better

13:42

because I've been more involved in the

13:44

process of the new CEO getting getting

13:46

assault in the business if you would

13:48

give clearly steps to advise to an

13:53

entrepreneur that's going to in this

13:55

process putting a CEO in place what

13:58

would be the specific steps 2 3 4 or 5

14:01

things so yeah so number one make sure

14:05

that you are 100% ready to leave as a

14:08

CEO like meaning you're not gonna make

14:10

him take the decisions the CEO is going

14:12

to take this issues they may not agree

14:13

with you just need to go in with hundred

14:16

100% trust

14:18

number two make sure that you have that

14:20

like Oh morning schedule and clear path

14:23

and plan of like how involved are you

14:25

gonna be in a year and how are you gonna

14:26

get there and make sure that both

14:28

parties are happy with that setup and

14:32

number three keep checking in on that

14:34

plan like it's this class so working for

14:35

your new CEO do I need to do more or

14:38

less how can I best support you and of

14:41

course like aside of that make sure that

14:43

all the data and information that you

14:45

leave before is is is real and like

14:48

don't try to make something look better

14:50

than it is because the CEO is gonna deal

14:52

with everything so just know just a

14:55

final recommendation is to make sure

14:57

that you give real data and like a real

15:00

situation of the business because this

15:02

there's no like when you

15:04

you're a CEO don't try to you know put

15:07

makeup on the pink sort of thing don't

15:09

try to make the business look better

15:11

than it is coz the CEO is gonna come in

15:13

and have to deal with everything and

15:14

they you know you don't want to be

15:15

surprised when you step in and then I

15:18

guess one last thing I do see like

15:21

entrepreneurs coming in to different

15:24

markets with the idea of like I'm gonna

15:26

start you know a several businesses and

15:28

then I'm gonna hire a CEO for them to

15:30

run it or just like the one business

15:33

like I don't want to run this but it's a

15:34

good ideas I'm just gonna get it started

15:36

and hire CEO I've never seen that work

15:39

successfully startups and new companies

15:42

is hard work by great them stamina and

15:45

don't count on anyone else doing that

15:48

work for you so do a CEO transition

15:52

after like the company is in a safe zone

15:54

and you like work with it and you know

15:56

the business in and out to make a

15:59

successful transfer and if we move over

16:02

to vent can you share a little bit more

16:06

about what then what type of company was

16:08

vent when you started and what is it now

16:11

yeah so when I started vent I was

16:14

searching for I had been soul searching

16:16

for a while like what I wanted to try

16:18

and do and spend time with in my life in

16:23

general and I knew that you know the

16:25

next company that I started needed to be

16:27

more tightly you know sort of tightly

16:32

just it needed to be closer to my own

16:35

personal passion and I'm a person who is

16:39

more or less all about health and

16:41

well-being and eating healthy and being

16:44

active having an ask active lifestyle

16:46

and so forth so went first stabbed for

16:51

me to try to make the world healthier

16:53

and stronger the way we did it with

16:57

Vince version one was to build a

17:00

marketplace and peer-to-peer marketplace

17:02

which means that we have two sides of

17:05

the marketplace where any one single

17:07

user could you know get and create an

17:09

account and either offer their services

17:11

or buy services from another person so

17:15

the idea was one of the biggest

17:18

challenges with fitness and people not

17:20

being active is the barrier of

17:22

intimidation people are so afraid of

17:26

going to yoga class with twenty

17:28

different new people in that I've been

17:29

doing yoga for maybe you know five years

17:31

and they're a beginner so an equal

17:36

equally people are afraid of going to

17:38

personal trainer because personal

17:40

trainers feel so so much it's so

17:43

expensive and it's so over the top right

17:45

so this Martha face were to connect

17:48

people that had passion and a sport or

17:51

workout to say hey I love running I've

17:54

been running for several years come with

17:56

me on a run on Friday when I'll show you

17:58

some some how it's run easier and better

18:01

and do good run workout and for these

18:03

people on the other side to just have

18:05

like easy access to all these people

18:07

it's huge passion and knowledge about

18:09

different types of sports is it more

18:11

like dating up or is it more like Airbnb

18:13

for for pts basically I definitely don't

18:17

want to call it a dating app it's more

18:21

in the line of that bike you could say

18:23

hey I'm a runner I'll take three people

18:25

with more this Friday morning run will

18:27

go into the app and you can see you know

18:29

Louise is doing a run on Friday and then

18:31

Walter is having you know a boxing

18:34

session and then yo on here does you

18:37

know you know cross CrossFit workout

18:40

that I can join so it was just an array

18:43

of experiences that you could join from

18:46

people that weren't necessarily

18:47

full-time personal trainers just had a

18:49

lot of experience with them their their

18:51

hobbies right but they're getting paid

18:53

though right yes

18:54

in yeah we tried a few different payment

18:57

methods to these people on the other

18:59

side yeah so and that was the original

19:01

event and then you had this pivot where

19:03

you completely changed it right and what

19:06

did it change into so long story short

19:09

Vince we're doing so good on the

19:10

consumer side but the supply side was a

19:14

pain so we and this is about five years

19:17

ago we saw so many peer-to-peer

19:19

marketplace is coming out basically all

19:21

of them fail due to the supply side

19:23

meaning that it is really hard to get

19:25

people to commit to what they promised

19:27

to do like in an individual just like

19:30

workforce

19:31

is hard to to assemble so we had a ton

19:36

of you know signed up instructors that

19:38

didn't show up or chance at last-minute

19:40

or rescheduled and that just made the

19:44

entire cat forum fail what we realized

19:48

is that the technical platform that we

19:49

built that had just like showing

19:51

activities in a communication social

19:56

feed like community feature what a ton

20:01

of of those engagement people were

20:04

opening our app even on the days they

20:06

were not booking a workout or going to a

20:08

workout so the pivot though ended up

20:11

working because we tried a ton of

20:12

different things was white-label version

20:17

for fitness studios so that they could

20:19

use our technical platform when they

20:21

when they handled bookings and payments

20:24

and scheduling so today we we are a

20:26

booking scheduling platform for fitness

20:29

videos right so your b2b business

20:31

basically the problem you had with the

20:33

supply side in the peer-to-peer

20:35

marketplace is that a general problem of

20:37

a peer-to-peer marketplace is that

20:40

specific to your industry do you think

20:41

so we've seen it in people doing pure

20:45

spirit cleaning peer-to-peer lending

20:48

peer-to-peer tasks hand handling so I

20:53

think it's unfortunately just a general

20:55

problem that we're seeing people pack

20:58

yeah so good extra bucks on Friday

21:01

morning 6:00 a.m. and then happy hour

21:03

happens on Thursday and they're like

21:05

whatever it's not my livelihood you know

21:07

so yeah you're from you've lived in

21:11

Stockholm for a long time and now you

21:13

live in Silicon Valley what's the

21:16

biggest difference is not that you've

21:18

run a couple of businesses in the US and

21:22

in Sweden so one of the things that is a

21:26

huge difference is how you look at and

21:29

think about hierarchy so in Sweden we

21:31

have young DeLorean which essentially

21:34

means it's a cultural thing it means

21:35

that you're never better than the people

21:37

so as a CEO in Sweden you know you will

21:40

do the dishes you will you know you will

21:43

cheat you're your coworker

21:45

is your employees very much the same

21:48

across multiple different titles and

21:51

levels and you're just gonna try to make

21:55

sure to give tasks but not maybe like

21:58

detailing them so much for like having

22:01

people run run marketing or one month or

22:05

whatever it is that you need done

22:07

what I realized here in what it is a

22:11

different view on hierarchy you want to

22:13

see different levels you expect to see

22:16

the CEO and indigenous you expect the

22:19

your boss to give you way more tiers

22:22

sort of directives is that a thing you

22:25

know set up a marketing plan maybe you

22:28

want to hear a lot could you expect it

22:29

to be all social media or do you expect

22:31

it to be events or do you expect it to

22:33

be with partners so forth so you make

22:35

more directives you expect to see more

22:37

hierarchy it's just just a more

22:41

controlled environment I'd say and it

22:44

makes sense I think you know Sweden we

22:46

have a different social structure system

22:49

which means that even if you were to not

22:53

hate your rules at work you're not going

22:55

to be fired on the dime and here in the

22:57

US you could actually be and you would

23:00

be at without a job and like you know in

23:02

within the minute so I think there's

23:04

just like a different mentality here

23:06

from how the system works

23:07

um and then I live in the bubble you

23:10

know I live in Silicon Valley so the

23:12

commodity is not the rest of the US but

23:15

what we have here in Silicon Valley is

23:17

that we it is really really hard to keep

23:19

talent I'm not saying that it's easy in

23:22

Sweden or Stockholm but it is way easier

23:26

so we have all these tech companies

23:28

snagging talent from each other back and

23:30

forth but more importantly we have

23:32

talent that are building their own

23:34

portfolios up here so with most

23:37

companies you will get an option program

23:39

and we see talent going to stay for the

23:41

duration of getting their their shares

23:44

their equity their options in the in the

23:47

company and then they will move on to

23:49

the next one to build their own

23:50

portfolio to make sure that they have

23:52

you know a better chance of getting a

23:54

high hitter in there

23:56

portfolio companies that they worked in

23:58

right so they work there like a mini

23:59

mini VC they want to pay the odds

24:02

yeah it's very well thought through

24:04

process you know I can't blame them it's

24:07

it's pretty smart to say I have you know

24:10

shares in uber and twiddle lifts and

24:16

whatever you know air be me it's and

24:20

probably you know it's trying to join

24:21

like a very early startup to get more

24:23

more shares and more equity to have a

24:25

diverse portfolio but that also means

24:29

you can't you like loyalty it's a

24:32

different thing here in the US than it

24:34

is back home but does that possibly like

24:37

cross pollinate the whole people moving

24:40

around these startups in that way that

24:43

moves knowledge around as well right so

24:45

it kind of makes all the companies like

24:48

innovate as a unit almost like a social

24:50

unit yeah at some level you know it's

24:52

some some level of your title and you're

24:54

not gonna be able to move to specific

24:57

competitors according like the

25:00

agreements that you sign right but for

25:02

sure I mean I mean of course like

25:05

whoever is working at Airbnb and then

25:07

goes to - ooh BRR we'll share we'll

25:10

share the way they work and like bring

25:13

ideas front from their experiences right

25:15

so it could actually help the entire

25:17

community possibly we don't know but

25:18

that could be added to see I think the

25:20

research and if you if you look at

25:22

Scandinavia and you compare it to the US

25:25

and Silicon Valley what do you think we

25:27

can learn in Scandinavia so that we can

25:30

get a culture that supports

25:32

entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship

25:34

even more so ah here's the thing

25:38

Silicon Valley is dying and I think like

25:42

in five six years we will have some of

25:45

the big hitters still being in this city

25:47

startups are already seeing to other

25:49

cities this city is so expensive it is

25:52

expensive to live expensive to eat

25:55

expensive to have a house to rent a

25:58

house an apartment super expensive to

26:01

hire talents due to what we just

26:04

discussed just like the the

26:06

the hiring market is insane and prices

26:09

of living is very high so we already see

26:11

startups going to Sacramento's to Los

26:13

Angeles - you know Denver so I think in

26:17

six years like the hype of like Silicon

26:19

Valley being the startup like you know

26:22

center of the universe we're not gonna

26:24

see that much longer

26:27

and I think investors it's gonna catch

26:30

all this within very soon - so I think

26:35

rather we should be very very proud of

26:37

what we have in Scandinavia I mean salsa

26:39

microrna pub has done tremendously well

26:42

in the last couple years if we look at

26:44

sort of the outside talent that we've

26:46

received and got into the country like

26:48

now that I go back to Sweden I hear

26:50

English everywhere do - we have so many

26:53

expats

26:55

so many that we didn't have with just

26:57

five years ago before I moved and it's

26:59

due to these like big companies that

27:01

we've been able to build in Sweden and

27:03

we should be super proud of that and I

27:05

think rather than like seeing what we

27:08

can learn to do better in terms of like

27:10

what 10 Francis was doing better we

27:12

should see what is happening now and I

27:14

know there's discussions on like housing

27:16

is too expensive and how can we get more

27:18

talent into the country if if if living

27:21

costs are so high and I think that's a

27:23

discussion that we need to keep keep

27:26

going to not fall in the same trap as

27:29

Silicon Valley has done the course of

27:31

this entire initiative about what's in

27:34

the water is that the hypothesis that

27:39

things are getting more automated and

27:41

when things get more automated people

27:44

will basically jobs will disappear and

27:47

that's what what's happened over years

27:49

and years and years in the past and will

27:52

continue happen and what we think is

27:55

that we need to supercharge

27:56

entrepreneurship and enjoy preneur ship

27:58

in Scandinavia and the rest of the world

28:01

to offset that and create new types of

28:04

jobs and new types of businesses that

28:08

really helps the world to become better

28:12

and do you agree with this is that does

28:17

that resonate with what you think or

28:20

do you think it's the opposite or how do

28:23

you think what do you think about that I

28:25

think that's 100% right I think I think

28:30

we're going into a future where you know

28:33

we have a school system that doesn't

28:34

support kids with how the future is

28:36

gonna look we have you know tons of

28:40

young kids that is going to be standing

28:43

outside of their schools with it you

28:45

know having looking for work that is no

28:50

longer going to exist and I think what

28:52

we need to start preparing ourselves for

28:54

the current generation and the

28:56

generations to come is how to be more

28:58

creative and how to build your own

29:00

future and responsibility for your own

29:03

life in terms of like creating

29:05

businesses and being creative and I

29:07

think that's gonna be so much more

29:08

fulfilling for so many more people I

29:11

think this is a great message and you

29:14

know life it's never been easier to

29:16

start a business to what it is now

29:18

there's so many different tools out

29:19

there to help you get started with you

29:23

know no or little to no no costs at all

29:27

of trying ideas and and testing you know

29:31

products out on the market and finding

29:33

partner market it has never been easier

29:35

so I think yeah just trying to to get

29:40

people on board with using their

29:41

creativity and taking their own

29:43

responsibility instead of going to

29:45

probably get work out one of the big

29:47

companies makes a ton of sense for the

29:49

future and the last interview that we

29:51

unfortunately not have on tape we talked

29:57

a little bit about because you had this

29:58

amazing when you start started blah blah

30:01

foods that we haven't talked about yet

30:02

you had this amazing process on how you

30:05

did it and I think that's connects

30:08

really good to what you just said can't

30:10

share about that process yes during last

30:12

year you know again before each company

30:16

that I started there's there's a period

30:18

of soul-searching right what is it that

30:20

want to do what is it that I feel

30:21

passionate about what are the problems

30:23

in the world that I want to solve and I

30:25

came out with probably like 20 different

30:26

ideas that I felt like this could be

30:28

something and I made sure to test them

30:31

also testing business ideas is very easy

30:34

today and depending on what type of

30:36

business idea it is that you want to try

30:38

there's different type of platforms for

30:40

it so the majority of my ideas all work

30:43

like there's like food and nutrition and

30:45

healthy living sort of so the majority

30:48

of them were just a website to begin

30:51

with so I build websites mostly through

30:54

Squarespace or a different type of

30:56

platform that helps you set that up

30:57

quickly and easily and from there I I

31:02

created ad campaigns so I went to since

31:06

this was consumer based ideas I went to

31:09

Facebook and Instagram and I tried a few

31:11

different audiences that I thought could

31:13

be interested in these ideas so I drove

31:15

traffic to these websites and I mostly

31:18

like not all of them but many of them

31:20

have like a Buy Now button they all

31:23

crashed when you try to click on this

31:26

specific button because I didn't have

31:28

anything to sell but at least I can see

31:31

traffic for like how many people would

31:32

click on this ad once I get them to come

31:35

to the website how many would try to buy

31:37

the product because this is real numbers

31:40

and of course before doing all this you

31:42

need to decide like how many how many

31:44

people do I need to reach like just

31:46

getting in front of this ad how many

31:48

people do I want on the website and how

31:50

many people needs to click on buy now to

31:53

to be successful because otherwise as an

31:55

honor

31:56

you're always so optimistic that you're

31:58

gonna be like this is good enough this

31:59

is great so make sure that you have the

32:02

numbers clear before you start the test

32:05

and of course only three of my 20 ideas

32:08

were good enough to like move to the

32:10

next step so that gives you a sense of

32:13

how important it is to test things

32:15

before you start working on them so all

32:17

of these like 20 ideas have I it was not

32:20

a business name that I would run with it

32:22

was not the website that was perfect

32:24

that I would want to like South through

32:26

the product wasn't like a hundred isn't

32:28

there that it was just like an idea

32:30

where I wanted to go but he gave me a

32:32

gut feel from doing these

32:33

tests which three concepts might work

32:37

and from there I spent three months deep

32:40

diving all these three concepts and like

32:43

learning about the industries talking to

32:46

people that might be partners or

32:48

competitors or clients thinking about by

32:51

how I could improve you know the

32:54

offering doing more testing similar

32:56

today I did the first time and what came

32:59

out in the end was blah blah foods how

33:01

much time did you spend on each project

33:04

before you came to the face when it was

33:06

twenty ideas how much time did he spend

33:09

on each and how much money did you spend

33:10

on each and when it came down to three

33:13

ideas how much time and how much money

33:15

just just approximately so to understand

33:19

your like a July thinking prototyping

33:24

face so with the initial 20 ideas it

33:28

probably took me two months from my

33:30

these are the ideas that I'm going to

33:32

test and so having being done with all

33:34

the testing so um you know and it

33:38

wouldn't be two months if I didn't have

33:40

that many if it was fewer you would be

33:42

done with the process within you know

33:44

four weeks because setting it up on on

33:47

one of these I already made you know

33:49

website sites is quick if you have some

33:54

experience of working with a computer

33:56

you're going to be done with that in a

33:57

day same thing with like ads and then it

34:01

all it all depends on like do you want

34:03

to spend twenty bucks or do you want to

34:05

spend 200 bucks on marketing to to

34:08

understand you know how well your

34:11

message resonates with your audience and

34:13

I think you need to decide depending on

34:16

like your budget for testing comes down

34:19

to a few things how sure are you on your

34:21

audience because if you're not a hundred

34:23

wasn't short on your audience you may

34:24

need to test and add towards different

34:27

audiences so that's gonna affect your

34:29

budget how sure are you of your

34:31

messaging in your ad that's going to

34:33

affect your your budget for its

34:35

protesting as well so if you know like

34:38

you know so for instance blah blah Foods

34:40

is easy because I know that's mom like

34:42

I'm I targeted audience our mothers

34:45

maybe dad's but mainly is gonna be moms

34:47

they're gonna be you know having babies

34:49

between six months and one and a half

34:51

year old mainly and a huge perk is is

34:56

they are Swedish

34:57

because we have you know products that

34:59

are based on the Scandinavian culture

35:01

here in the US so like that audience was

35:03

super you see and I probably spend like

35:05

30 bucks on everything total to have it

35:07

tested and done and then I had a few

35:11

other ideas but we're way more

35:12

complicated but I don't think I ever

35:15

spend more than 50 bucks on like ads but

35:18

I think one of the very important things

35:21

is when inside the ad so you don't see

35:24

any action make sure that you tweak it

35:26

or it or to stop it like you still have

35:29

within 50 bucks you still have

35:31

impressions enough to try different

35:33

messaging I think this is something

35:35

that's really interesting for people to

35:37

hear like how easy it is to test things

35:40

and how cheap it is and and I don't

35:43

think a lot of people don't do that

35:45

enough no and think about your life like

35:47

your time is so valuable so even if you

35:50

were to spend you know 200 bucks on

35:52

testing like that's gonna save you

35:54

probably like six months of your life

35:56

for like building that's not gonna

35:58

work

35:58

Oh should we have done that that for

36:01

what's in the water Johan well it's a

36:06

little bit too late now spent how many

36:10

hours have you spent on a Sabbath and

36:13

and cash as well so so I'm learning from

36:18

you Louise that that would have been but

36:22

but in the other hand what if the tests

36:26

would have turned out to be not true

36:28

but that's why you want people to be

36:30

like just try to sell it I just have

36:32

this i-beam like oops something happened

36:34

we crashed we're like let's talk because

36:38

that is real numbers but then again you

36:40

need to be you need to understand your

36:42

audience and you need to be able to

36:46

target that audience to get the route

36:47

you know true responses to I just think

36:50

even if you spend slightly more on the

36:52

testing again it's gonna save you so

36:54

much time I see people especially better

36:55

build

36:56

technical solutions and apps like it's

37:00

sad to see someone you know sitting to

37:02

build build technical solutions for like

37:05

a year and then nothing happens when

37:07

they launch so yeah I just really think

37:11

people should figure out a way and maybe

37:13

it's not a website maybe it's not an app

37:15

maybe it is you know using whatsapp as a

37:18

testing environment maybe it is using

37:20

flash as a testing environment I don't

37:22

know but there's with everything that is

37:24

out there today I bet you can find a

37:27

good testing environment for your idea

37:28

before used our building and spending a

37:30

ton of time on it yeah I had a

37:32

discussion with my mentor before we

37:34

started this podcast whether we should

37:36

start a podcasts and write a book

37:38

without actually recording anything or

37:40

writing anything and just marketing the

37:42

hell out of it and see what happens

37:43

because most people don't read books

37:45

they buy them but they like 10% read

37:47

them or something and there was a

37:50

restaurant doing that in London I think

37:52

where they had like super high real

37:54

juice on Yelp but the restaurant didn't

37:56

exist and it and they only launched it

37:59

after they got like the five-star review

38:01

then they launched it sound smart I like

38:04

that yeah that's that's Louisa style I'm

38:10

just meeting like your time is always

38:11

gonna be the most expensive thing that

38:13

yeah so make sure that you spend your

38:15

time wisely great but we want to hear a

38:18

little bit more about blah blah foods

38:19

tell us about that yeah so blah blah

38:21

Foods has said the next generation

38:24

micelle brand for young families so

38:26

we're producing plant-based and

38:28

sustainable products essentially you

38:29

know when I had my son and I realized

38:32

like holy crap my son who's now 2 is

38:36

gonna probably live you know to be a

38:38

hundred and fifty that's your 2167 just

38:42

like putting that into perspective I'm

38:44

like dude we need to change things like

38:47

we are feeding our kids foods that are

38:49

full of preservatives additives corn

38:52

syrup especially here in the States

38:54

the products are more or less disgusting

38:56

and they make kids sick and on top of

39:00

that we keep consuming products that you

39:02

know sort of like food pouches that are

39:04

get straight into landfill so

39:08

like coming through from that

39:09

perspective I'm like we need to do more

39:11

and I need to take action so bla bla

39:14

Foods is producing plant-based healthy

39:16

foods to have you know kids grow up

39:19

being healthy and strong and we Purdue

39:22

where we are going into making every day

39:25

essential products that are sustainable

39:27

for our environment so all of our

39:30

products are inspired by my Swedish

39:32

heritage so we we do clean minimalistic

39:35

simple products the food products that

39:38

we have on market now one is veiling

39:41

which have existed through in

39:43

Scandinavia three generations and 55% of

39:45

all kids in Sweden drink felling I'm

39:47

sure you guys know availing so we are

39:54

the first company to produce and sell it

39:56

outside of the region and our version is

39:58

100% camp based you know it is a thick

40:02

nutrient dense delicious milk that kids

40:05

love and parents love it because it is

40:08

an ease of mind knowing that at least

40:10

your kid had venting on those days when

40:12

you don't know how much your little one

40:14

had to eat and I think maybe more

40:17

importantly Swedes swear Speights power

40:19

to help kids sleep through the night so

40:21

is that one last drink before bedtime

40:24

your kid will sleep better yeah and the

40:27

second second product that we have a

40:28

market now is smart oats so it's a

40:30

superfood charge oatmeal that is pink

40:33

and creamy so so kids will love it and

40:36

you know it's it's it's an oatmeal so

40:38

it's for everyone in the families to

40:40

enjoy it's just a very healthy

40:42

nutrient-dense breakfast and that we saw

40:44

so now from the marketing department in

40:47

Sweden I have two pieces of advice one

40:50

one I want you to have a product called

40:52

nightcap which is like the thing you

40:55

give the baby when they're gonna sleep

40:57

like prepackaged valine and the second

41:01

one is to have super old super beautiful

41:03

Swedish ladies in your ads Benison like

41:08

100 110 year olds that were that weren't

41:11

grown up eating Belling I assume exactly

41:14

fantastic

41:15

I'm gonna that is amazing yeah fantastic

41:18

so I I'd like to ask you something about

41:21

no ship and and what we could do better

41:22

in Sweden because after all that's our

41:24

purpose that's what we're trying to do

41:26

here to see if we can make Scandinavia

41:28

and Sweden better in terms of

41:30

entrepreneurship and what advice if you

41:32

would sit down and I think we have a lot

41:34

of politicians listening to this so what

41:36

advice would you give them as how to

41:38

change something in Sweden to make

41:41

Scandinavia to make the environment

41:43

better for entrepreneurs so um number

41:46

one I think we need to look at our

41:48

school system and I know it's difficult

41:49

and hard but again we're going into

41:52

future where we we are currently

41:53

preparing our kids for for work that is

41:56

not going to exist and I think we need

42:00

to think of the way to help kids stay

42:02

creative to help kids you know learning

42:06

how to talk in front of an audience how

42:08

to sell how to present better how to

42:13

take an idea into sort of rotation

42:16

that's exactly what I think too that

42:18

there's the whole whole whole idea of

42:21

working in an agile way with MVPs and

42:25

all that it's about

42:26

coping with uncertainty with not knowing

42:30

what how things will be received and and

42:33

and that's exactly what we need to teach

42:35

the kids because when the world is

42:37

moving this in this pace they don't know

42:40

and we don't know either and we are

42:41

sitting here like creating these

42:43

curriculums based on something that we

42:47

actually do know it's not going to be

42:48

the same going forward and just teaching

42:52

kids to cope with that uncertainty it

42:53

should be a much more central part of

42:57

the curriculum and I think I think that

43:00

is to just secure the future that is one

43:03

of the things that we need to do the

43:05

second one is going back to what is

43:07

happening here in Silicon Valley where

43:08

like everything is too expensive for

43:10

startups everyone is fleeing Silicon

43:12

Valley and it's gonna die out if we look

43:16

at the rate of how things are doing

43:17

going so looking at how can we create

43:20

housing and life opportunities in

43:23

Stockholm which is the tech city of

43:25

Sweden right now to to attract talent to

43:30

attract startups to make it easier to

43:32

start companies and and

43:34

and so forth I think that's the two main

43:36

things I think we should be very happy

43:39

with sort of the social system in Sweden

43:42

right now where it is easier for people

43:44

to take a leap of faith and start

43:46

companies and we should be very happy

43:48

for the structured system that we have

43:50

because here in the US people take away

43:52

bigger risk when starting their own

43:55

businesses than back in Sweden I think

43:57

that should be clear and we should we

44:00

should take advantage of that and people

44:01

should understand that better when I

44:03

went to school math was the main skill

44:07

that I could use afterwards in my

44:09

business career and the other things

44:11

they just they didn't cut it as you said

44:13

like presentation skills and personal

44:16

communication is so important knowing

44:20

how to influence other people and just

44:23

basic values and understanding like when

44:26

you had your life crisis like how do you

44:29

find out what you want in life yeah how

44:32

about learn teaching people that and and

44:38

with with our kids we we actually now

44:42

we've decided to they have a YouTube

44:44

channel our kids and they're they're six

44:47

and almost eight and I mean it's I mean

44:53

it's amazing training them to creating

44:56

video when they're this age because the

45:00

like the state that I went into when I

45:03

started making videos and hearing my own

45:05

voice etc etc when that's taken care of

45:09

before the age of 10 I think it's

45:13

completely different how you view

45:15

communication and they're better at that

45:17

in the u.s. actually with especially

45:19

with public speaking they do a lot more

45:21

of that yeah that's something we should

45:23

learn from for sure and and talking

45:25

about sort of the future and like how do

45:28

you figure out what you want to do we we

45:30

have gymnastics in school which is great

45:32

I think we should have more activity in

45:33

school but that thing like you know at a

45:38

certain age you know bringing meditation

45:40

to school talking about feelings talking

45:43

about you know

45:44

ever all the challenges that they're

45:45

gonna go through when they in such a

45:48

rapidly changing world because it's

45:50

gonna keep on changing it's gonna be a

45:52

faster change than we've ever seen so

45:55

you know involving kids at a young age

45:58

to talk about those things so that they

46:01

don't end up lost and depressed you know

46:04

I I do think schools should take a

46:06

responsibility not to for sure life life

46:09

skills

46:09

one of those life skills that I think

46:12

that you often push for Walter which i

46:14

think is great and that I'm not even

46:17

close to doing is programming that

46:19

everyone should learn program yeah

46:21

coding yeah for sure absolutely I mean

46:24

it's it's it's insane that that is not a

46:26

part of the school program at this stage

46:29

I'm like yeah it's getting there though

46:31

the problem is finding good teachers I

46:34

think yeah and I think the entire like

46:37

transformation that's gonna happen is

46:39

that the teachers will be more

46:41

facilitators and the teachings will be

46:44

more digital from people that are the

46:46

best in the world

46:47

I think that transformation has to come

46:49

because otherwise the quality will not

46:52

be high enough I hope some of our

46:55

friends do home schooling here in the

46:57

States because that's what they do

46:58

they're like why should we send them to

47:00

school when we can fix like the best of

47:02

the best in Spanish and in coding and

47:05

then everything else through you know

47:07

Skype line it doesn't make any sense to

47:10

send them to school here when when I to

47:11

make sure that they have the best

47:12

education from home so yeah I hope

47:16

you're right I hope we see that in

47:17

schools within very soon we are we want

47:20

to be mindful of your deadline here it's

47:23

two minutes right yeah thank you your

47:25

time right so basically that's just

47:28

saying this has been great talking to

47:30

you I hope we will get this edit to work

47:34

for us and thank you so much for

47:38

recording not once but twice with us

47:41

thank you for having me I love the

47:44

discussion and yeah let's let's keep the

47:46

discussion going this is interesting

47:48

thank you so much

47:50

thank you for listening to what's in the

47:53

water

47:53

our ultimate goal with this podcast is

47:56

the supercharge entrepreneurship in

47:59

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48:02

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48:04

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48:45

what's in the water

48:46

Etha again thanks for listening and we

48:49

will see you again next week for a new

48:52

episode of what's in the water

48:55

[Music]