Dream Big with Konrad Bergström, Founder of Zound Industries & X Shore

Konrad Bergström-CoverArt_opt.jpg

Konrad Bergström is the founder of Sweden's fastest growing company of all time, Zound Industries, that sold over twenty million Marshall and Urban Ears headphones and speakers over a ten year period.

After recently being fired from Zound, Konrad embarked on a new entrepreneurial mission to save the seas with all electric boats with his company X Shore.

In this episode, Johan Åberg struggles to keep his co-host Walter Naeslund and Konrad on track throughout the three hour recording as the two long time friends (23 years and counting) head off in different tangents, fueled by half a dozen bottles of natural wine.

From this material, one hour of reasonably sane material could be distilled out in editing for your listening pleasure. A different episode for sure, but with tons of wisdom and extremely valuable business advice. You've been warned.


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Transcript

Note: This is an auto-generated transcript that will butcher words and names sometimes (Our favorite is when our guest Johannes Cullberg became “Your Hummus Cool Bye”). The format is not optimized for reading, but for searching for specific segments. Hence the timestamps etc. Happy searching!

00:03

welcome back to What's in water I'm

00:06

Joann a bird and this episode went

00:09

bonkers okay I think we sound pretty

00:12

amazing now and we looked fantastic and

00:14

we smell great it feels like yeah a

00:17

little bit smoke on the water what's in

00:19

the smoker wind enough to Alma I promise

00:23

you that I did my very best to keep our

00:25

guest Conor Bergstrom and my co-host

00:28

Walter nesland on track while they went

00:31

off the rails on natural wind and some

00:34

kind of internal humor that stems from a

00:37

23 year old friendship between the two

00:40

if you're a sensitive soul you may want

00:43

to consider skipping this episode if you

00:46

think you can handle it it will

00:48

definitely be worth your while there is

00:52

plenty of valuable advice here from one

00:55

of Sweden's most unique and colorful

00:58

entrepreneurs advice that you can go out

01:01

and implement today Konrad Bergstrom was

01:05

the driving force behind Sweden's

01:07

fastest growing company of all time

01:10

sound industries if you're not familiar

01:12

with that brand name you're probably

01:14

still familiar with their products like

01:16

urban air headphones and Marshall

01:18

headphones and speakers two million

01:21

products have been sold by sound

01:23

industries over the past ten years

01:25

totaling an incredible two thousand

01:28

40-foot containers of products not

01:32

twenty thousand containers by the way

01:35

on that later Connor recently got fired

01:38

from sound and went on to start another

01:40

company X sure that make all electric

01:43

boats he has even greater ambitions for

01:46

X sure them for sound those ambitions

01:48

seemed to be backed by quite a bit of

01:51

substance

01:51

judging from the headway they have made

01:53

so far so I'm incredibly happy proud and

01:57

a little bit nervous to bring you this

01:59

extraordinary episode with the founder

02:02

of sound and XOR Konrad Bergstrom

02:05

[Music]

02:10

[Applause]

02:11

[Music]

02:19

[Applause]

02:20

[Music]

02:28

Walter 2009 was offered to invest a

02:33

hundred thousand Kroners in sound yep

02:36

he's not happy but he didn't make the

02:38

investment but how much would how much

02:41

would the would it be worth today

02:43

ballpark figure his hundred thousand

02:45

Swedish kronor I think I think I made

02:47

the calculation that those hundred

02:49

thousand would be like ten million or

02:50

something I could live across the street

02:53

on the expensive side well it's pretty

02:57

close to the truth that would say you

03:01

have to bring this up every time Johan

03:03

I'm your poor investment so I think this

03:06

is the first time I'm actually terrible

03:08

investing money I'm it comes off to 40 I

03:12

hope so so who are you well I'm a pretty

03:17

nice asshole from the woods and the next

03:26

episode and we're done

03:28

It's A Wrap now I turn an or right well

03:33

I didn't know what entrepreneur was

03:35

until I was like 33 and started work for

03:39

another guy who kept shouting about this

03:42

entrepreneurship but yes I've been

03:44

running company since I was very very

03:46

small around 12 years so first I was in

03:50

the action sports business with the wind

03:54

surfing surf wakeboard kite boarding

03:56

snowboards etc etc I started off with

03:59

the boards and then came the shoes did I

04:02

walk for Sweden I did Quicksilver for

04:06

Scandinavia so kind of low instruct in

04:09

these regions and then 30 other brands

04:11

part on snow but as lost as as an

04:14

importer and that I all we know each

04:16

other

04:17

yes exactly you were a little wakeboard

04:19

boy yeah I was 17 years old and this his

04:22

man comes up to me and it wants to wants

04:25

me to ride on his boards now I think I

04:27

was 2 years ago this is 2 years ago

04:30

actually I think you I came back from

04:32

from the US I had been in the US and I I

04:35

still have this letter from O'Brien

04:37

which said welcome to the national team

04:40

and I was so proud it was 96 and I was

04:43

17

04:43

yeah and then I met Tony Finn and he

04:47

started a brand called liquid force so

04:50

he took me over from O'Brien to liquid

04:52

force and turns out when I come back to

04:55

Sweden that this guy is the agent for

04:58

liquid force boards in Sweden and that

05:00

was you exactly and that was 23 years

05:03

ago that was good times I don't want to

05:05

inflate your ego even more but I keep

05:09

telling people that you are probably the

05:12

one guy you know I've gone to school for

05:15

eight years yeah yeah yeah so you met

05:18

quite a few people six years on

05:20

University eight year or two years at

05:22

Burks School of Communication and you're

05:24

still the one person that I learned the

05:26

most from about communication and

05:27

branding oh nice thank you and I didn't

05:30

go to school you're probably one of the

05:38

best advertising guys in Sweden well I

05:42

used to be now I'm a professional

05:44

influencer a lass of wine

05:49

that's hilarious at that time I always

05:52

wanted to give the consumer something

05:54

back so I started to do this different

05:56

events and it was turned into festivals

05:59

I made the mega stores Nobel contest on

06:02

the globe arena and it was the first

06:05

indoor contest on snowboard we used ice

06:08

hockey arenas and The Verge best

06:11

snowballs came to Sweden we had the

06:14

prize man we raised the prize money from

06:16

$10,000 to $100,000 and everybody came I

06:23

was also you know building the biggest

06:25

ramp people at that time went to

06:28

different competitions but it was a

06:29

little fake it was more the party and

06:31

and the PR around it and people didn't

06:34

build the site so good but we actually

06:37

did so we had a super good competition

06:42

and

06:43

I think we were televised over 40

06:45

countries globally we had like 1 billion

06:49

potential viewers of course my head got

06:54

a little big with that thing and I

06:56

thought that that was the future I

06:58

pulled down a little bit on the

06:59

distribution and and the reason why I

07:02

did it in ice hockey arenas was that I

07:04

was not going to be having bad weather

07:06

but with the doing festivals outside

07:10

comes with bad weather so we went really

07:12

big and didn't have the weather on us we

07:14

didn't have anything on our side

07:16

basically I went bankrupt I woke up one

07:19

day with like 5 million in personal

07:22

depth when you go bankrupt there is a

07:24

chance that you're getting all depths

07:27

personal and that more or less happened

07:30

to me so then I had to take like three

07:33

years to to clean that up it was a mess

07:37

it's always easy to look back on things

07:39

and the the mistake I did was that I was

07:43

in love with the company I couldn't see

07:46

if things didn't work I just you know

07:49

was stubborn and I did it until I

07:52

thought it was gonna work because it

07:54

must work instead of changing and doing

07:57

after my bankruptcy I've been you know

08:00

super straightforward that everything is

08:04

for the companies I work with passion

08:06

but I'm not in love when you're in love

08:08

you take stupid decisions when you work

08:11

with passion you can still cut

08:13

relationships sometimes that is not

08:16

beneficial for the company running a

08:19

company is about making money and then

08:21

you can do it in a good way or some you

08:25

know sell drugs and you might say that

08:28

is a bad way I decided to do it by the

08:32

book and challenged myself in that and

08:35

it worked very well with this electronic

08:37

company called sound where we sold like

08:40

over 20 million products in in 10 years

08:44

we're in 125 countries the quickest

08:47

growing company in history in in Sweden

08:50

according to doggins industry gazelle

08:53

you have to it's not only the revenue

08:56

that counts

08:57

is also that you're profitable so it's a

09:00

combination of revenue and growth with

09:04

profitability and I think that is how

09:07

you should run a company you could also

09:09

look at how many containers we shipped

09:11

so basically one container is between

09:16

eight and twelve thousand products

09:19

depending on what size it is

09:21

so say like it's ten thousand products

09:24

in the container and you sold 20 million

09:27

that to me is a lot of containers yeah

09:31

it's a twenty thousand containers or two

09:34

thousand containers I don't to school

09:36

for eight years I can say for certain

09:37

that is twenty thousand correct so you

09:41

can imagine if you pull up twenty

09:43

thousand 40-foot containers and put them

09:47

on each other that is how many products

09:49

we sold with sound so far when you

09:53

started you went out and raised a bunch

09:55

of money right we didn't raise that much

09:58

there's so much to this story but we

10:00

actually got punished for making money

10:03

so we didn't get the right valuation but

10:05

as we were making money we didn't need

10:07

to bring in so much money so why -

10:12

because it was not very cool to make

10:14

money

10:15

there was other companies who put up big

10:18

projections and and taking the market

10:20

and gonna make money later some of them

10:24

survived and they did terrific you're

10:27

one of them is like Spotify but there is

10:29

very many cases that didn't do that

10:32

and with my bankruptcy I took the

10:35

decision that we are going to have cash

10:37

in the tail because otherwise we will

10:40

start to fight against each other of the

10:43

founders we were seven other people so

10:46

eight founders with me and we also

10:48

wanted to make sure that we were having

10:51

the power ourselves if you if you have a

10:54

finance guy they can totally change your

10:56

business plan and they saying like if

10:58

you want another ten million you're

11:01

gonna do it like this way and sometimes

11:03

that's good but sometimes it can be if

11:06

you have a strong vision I think that's

11:07

pretty bad yeah yeah and we didn't want

11:10

some

11:11

to say like oh now we're just going to

11:12

do blue headphones so we decided that we

11:15

were going to be profitable and it was

11:18

also of course after my big experience

11:22

of the bankruptcy to try to pull out

11:24

this cash and pay it I mean it went from

11:28

something you know having fun with the

11:30

companies it was like my bankruptcy was

11:33

actually growing up in the in the

11:35

business industry that is when I started

11:38

to I always as I said I worked a lot all

11:42

my life but took it more I took more

11:46

hard decisions when it came to I'm a

11:49

feeling person you know I cry a lot

11:54

sometimes I laugh a lot I have a

11:57

question for Walter who's the sound guy

12:00

in a different sense this you're

12:02

responsible for the sound in this

12:03

recording I know that you really like

12:06

eye contact when you're speaking with us

12:09

but why why don't you have like sliders

12:12

from the top that we will that we can

12:15

also do that's actually a great idea

12:16

great thank you

12:18

well actually well I guess ice yeah well

12:20

we'll work on it

12:21

I'll work something but that's not gonna

12:24

be solved oh yes call ASEA and get some

12:27

robots yes really good that would be

12:31

awesome though abb actually that's not a

12:33

bad product so so I think just talking

12:36

to the microphone will be fine III think

12:38

we'll draw I saw a stand-up comedy show

12:42

the other day and they said that this

12:43

guy was obsessed with nunchucks you know

12:46

the nunchucks the bruce lee nunchucks

12:47

and he said that you can also make them

12:50

out of a pair of handcuffs and two

12:53

dildos and they've become even more

12:57

scary and with the microphone as well i

13:02

think we could draw something on here

13:04

and and make a corner and want to be in

13:06

front of it a little bit more or less so

13:11

we will just Walter can you be the a now

13:15

you're taking this sorry sorry but can

13:18

you can you just point to the mic when

13:21

you want Conrad to the

13:23

I'll do this yep and I didn't finger

13:27

okay so I can have a you were eight

13:30

founders with sound right yeah and I was

13:33

not one of them why no you were studying

13:36

at that time I was that's true

13:38

but so but that was not my actual and

13:41

you know but you and you were also very

13:44

dedicated to start almost yeah yeah that

13:47

was your baby an idea already at that

13:50

time yeah and yes and I had to do my own

13:54

journey yeah I think that was important

13:56

but anyway that was not my actual

13:58

question my actual question was that

14:00

founding team seems to have been an

14:03

amazing team it was the group who made

14:07

it magic you know I had an idea I could

14:09

see things that maybe not everybody

14:12

could see but this team together with me

14:15

form the success and what was the magic

14:19

really that I believe in when I've been

14:23

thinking about it now is that we always

14:26

took decisions that was the best for the

14:29

company

14:30

instead of making decisions that was

14:33

from a personal view so we could all

14:37

back off and we didn't have any we

14:39

understood if this company is going to

14:41

be successful we're all going to have

14:44

the benefit we don't have to have our

14:48

own success within this because we're

14:51

all going to be able to surf the wave

14:53

and that was a big thing how do you

14:57

share equity with the other founders

15:00

like how do you do that in a fair way

15:02

how did you get well it's never fair

15:04

because you don't know who's going to

15:05

deliver and what's standing from it is

15:07

really easy but you know everybody got a

15:11

good trip I mean we bought our shares

15:14

but ten order so one cent so of course

15:20

it's good now when we're selling it I

15:22

think it's trading at 250 or something

15:25

now I don't bring it up again

15:28

give me the wine don't bring it up don't

15:33

mention the war so next topic

15:36

yeah next question but how do you

15:37

how do you do I know did everyone get

15:39

the same amount no no I had the most

15:42

because I kind of had the ID and I

15:45

formed the team and it was also I had

15:47

the experience and the network so but I

15:50

gave away I think I had thirty seven and

15:54

a half percent from the beginning and

15:56

then we had a candidate who was doing

15:59

the finance and and standing behind the

16:03

company in the structure way my my pitch

16:07

to him was basically you know I have had

16:11

the word best business ideas for 10

16:13

years and succeed now I kind of always

16:17

fell under on the finish line stumbled

16:21

before the finish line you have had the

16:24

worst business ideas but you always been

16:26

successful because he made a lot of

16:28

money with his electronics and

16:30

restaurants and the stuff that he did

16:31

and he said like and I explained the

16:34

business ID and we met over a month like

16:37

here and there and say like what the

16:40

fuck is the catch because he didn't

16:42

trust me in that way and I'm said like

16:44

there is no catch this is fucking

16:47

amazing this is how we're gonna do it

16:49

while he signed up but I saw I remember

16:51

coming down to your first office it was

16:53

in the vasa stone somewhere I think we

16:56

actually were in gamla storm first and

16:58

then on Serdar but at that time it was

17:01

not official we were working on the

17:03

ground right down to the basement

17:05

somewhere yes well you didn't have any

17:07

cell phone coverage no it was and we

17:11

didn't have any company phone number

17:13

either right and you showed me that

17:15

presentation pitch and I remember seeing

17:17

I was like I thought that that's that's

17:19

an amazing pitch mmm but it's but these

17:23

you can't say that what was the pitch

17:25

the pitch was really good I can't

17:26

remember the exact it this was a long

17:28

time ago but I do remember thinking that

17:30

these projections and these numbers that

17:34

just can't be right there too well if we

17:37

wouldn't have put them up and the the

17:39

funny thing that out of my first

17:42

investors I think we brought in like

17:44

friends and family around 30 40 people

17:47

and no one came from the finance section

17:51

it was only me no nested with heart they

17:54

said you know that these guys are never

17:57

gonna make it this is a bunch of loser

18:00

so I actually had a good reason for not

18:03

investing in the company because I

18:04

didn't have I was dead broke at the time

18:06

yeah I I was too proud to admit that

18:08

yeah at that point but I can admit it

18:10

now I didn't have a single sow it feels

18:13

better yeah here's to that but I do have

18:17

another story related to that is that

18:23

another one of the other partners I

18:25

won't mention his name at my company was

18:27

also offered the same deal for some

18:29

reason I don't know why because you

18:30

don't you didn't know him but you knew

18:32

me I guess and he had money but he went

18:36

to this other guy at the company who was

18:37

the smart guy with the big education he

18:39

was like the by far the smartest guy in

18:42

the company in your company yes and he

18:45

and he's like what do you think I should

18:46

do do you think I shouldn't invest in

18:47

this and he said absolutely not this is

18:50

a terrible this is just so unrealistic

18:53

and which point yes but the thing is

18:57

that we actually we didn't nailed the

18:59

numbers we actually went over the

19:01

numbers and you know we but but but this

19:05

story is when we launched our first deal

19:08

was with H&M; we did a campaign that

19:12

fashion against AIDS and we made some

19:15

headphones with that campaign so that

19:19

was like three million crowns that was

19:21

our first year the year after we went

19:25

from three million up to 125 but we also

19:29

it was not 12 months on the 12 months

19:31

basis it was 108 million and this is sec

19:34

chronic is sec and then from 108 to 240

19:42

and then we changed our distribution so

19:45

actually we doubled again but the

19:48

numbers we got in was 325 and then we

19:53

changed the company structure we went

19:55

down to 314 and we had nine months where

19:59

we went down and then we were able to

20:02

change it and we took 500

20:05

37 I think and then 750 and then a

20:09

billion 40 and then 1.4 40 last year and

20:14

this year I wish them doing two billion

20:17

they they could do it

20:19

Wow but and this is this year is 2019 or

20:22

2018 2019 I don't know the projection

20:27

but that's definitely gonna be over two

20:29

billion and scaling what was the main

20:32

thing that made it possible that you

20:34

could scale so fast because this is

20:36

actually it's it's kind of unicorn

20:38

numbers because it's really money

20:40

there's a lot of there's a lot of

20:42

companies or some companies at least

20:44

tech companies that scale fast in user

20:47

base and such yeah but not in real

20:49

revenue with profits and not with a real

20:52

product that has to be designed produced

20:55

shipped you take care of a customer

20:58

service etc etc so mean

21:01

so complained in 2015 we we were gonna

21:04

launch or 2014 and we were going to

21:07

launch the Marshall smartphone and I was

21:11

after you know so I based the company on

21:16

technology a digital trend that music

21:20

was going digital and I understood that

21:23

if the phone get smart everybody is

21:26

gonna need headphones to be able to get

21:28

the full experience so it was a very

21:31

easy ID we didn't say that within a you

21:34

know marketed that way because I knew

21:36

that's gonna gonna come over selfie is

21:39

gonna be the coolest thing if you do um

21:42

the way your music for for media for

21:45

everything you know we had 65 years old

21:49

looking at the Aftonbladet or expression

21:53

using our headphones because they were

21:55

very clean but then we had also the loud

21:58

brands like Marshall that had a

22:01

different target group the whole idea

22:03

was that everybody is different so the

22:06

more educated people get the more they

22:09

Google the more individual they get and

22:13

that's why my belief is that you need

22:15

multiple brands to have a lodge

22:18

share of the market in the future there

22:22

will not be one brand who owns the old

22:23

market in a new segment we took a

22:25

decision it was a 40 cent decision on

22:29

the product that valued like $60 in

22:32

average - then the consumer that we put

22:35

on the microphone on all products so at

22:37

this time I don't know if you remember

22:39

cause Porter Pro but it was the biggest

22:42

supplier but they put on the microphone

22:46

2013 but we're talking 2009 and 2010 and

22:51

that's a very big difference it's a very

22:53

big difference so just putting on the

22:56

microphone gave us the best user

22:58

experience we didn't have to talk about

23:00

it but people and people didn't really

23:03

understand it but in 2009 when people

23:07

came with a big pair of headphones and

23:09

had a microphone people thought they

23:11

were crazy they thought that it would be

23:12

the air into the universe no he's

23:19

talking his mom so but but I gave a

23:25

better user experience and people loved

23:27

it and now it's obvious now everybody's

23:29

doing that you know yeah and that's the

23:31

way it is with a lot of Technology right

23:32

one thing then was this simple

23:35

innovation that maybe wasn't simple but

23:38

it was simple with the microphone

23:40

looking back it's looking looking back

23:42

what was other things that made it

23:45

possible to scale this

23:47

well I mean this whole idea came from my

23:52

bankruptcy you know I went through what

23:57

was the the bottlenecks what was the

24:00

problem how could I grow I knew I could

24:02

create trends I knew I could reach the

24:04

market through PR and different

24:08

campaigns I knew I was a good salesman

24:11

and I could you know get good coverage

24:15

in the stores etc I had all that but I

24:18

looked for a product that was one size

24:20

fits all a product that was small so it

24:24

had a big value within a small package

24:27

and I was choosing between making a

24:31

water

24:32

that was going to be a cool water like

24:34

Red Bull but healthy or like with a

24:37

meanwhile or something no no not no

24:41

sugar not that bullshit just plain water

24:45

with the bosses right

24:49

alkaline yes and I made a lot of study

24:53

it's a different thing and I might do

24:55

the water key thing was margin so we

24:58

could grow without because my company

25:02

before I kid the more I grew the more

25:04

problem the bigger headache I got so I

25:07

needed to find a product that had enough

25:10

margin and I calculated for like two

25:13

years how much what margin you need with

25:17

kind of payment terms and this with the

25:21

cash flow combination of cash flow and

25:25

margins

25:27

so you could grow organically without

25:30

any finance a product that was small

25:34

that could be shipped easily with the

25:38

big value with the big value yes so

25:41

value per cubic meter we looked at or I

25:46

looked at not with my events and making

25:52

the world's biggest snowboard

25:54

competition it was very quick and just

25:58

during a couple of hours I wanted to

26:01

have a product that I could scale up

26:05

quickly without having any problems with

26:08

my staff so I kind of you know having a

26:13

lot of employees at sound know but my

26:16

vision was that we were gonna you know I

26:19

this is really bad to say but I don't

26:23

like to have employees that take care of

26:25

employees and they are called bosses and

26:28

usually they suck I think people should

26:31

take their own responsibilities and

26:33

build within their segments and that

26:36

makes it much more efficient I didn't

26:38

succeed on that because but my vision

26:42

and I still believe in this when I'm

26:44

building my new car

26:45

and now that we don't have to be so many

26:48

people we just need to use today's

26:50

technology and different instruments to

26:52

make everything easier and and structure

26:55

it right from the beginning so we asked

26:58

very effective and we're putting all

27:00

energy into the project instead of side

27:03

things and side things for me is bad

27:06

energy and it's called politics that is

27:10

the evil of no success in companies yeah

27:13

I think a lot of people in their

27:15

companies and in especially in a lot of

27:17

larger companies they don't care about

27:20

what's the truth they don't care so much

27:23

about winning they more care about

27:25

looking good politics for me is building

27:27

out of ego politics for me is you know

27:32

there is so many different things I

27:38

don't know how long time we have but as

27:41

long as we think it's interesting okay

27:44

no but I

27:45

or the wine runs out yeah that's not

27:49

gonna be a problem what's in the fridge

27:54

Conrad's gonna be the main part in her

28:03

for this what's in the water fridge will

28:05

strike them so the the general idea so I

28:16

think it's politics is very bad for

28:19

winning in business you had actually as

28:20

one of the cornerstones we're gonna be a

28:23

billion a billion company sick and we

28:29

couldn't even dream and people thought

28:30

that we were crazy

28:31

all these finance people these guys are

28:34

never gonna reach that target these new

28:36

companies that went from zero to

28:38

something were not in Sweden at that

28:40

time I did it with a lot of American

28:44

companies that I represented in

28:46

Scandinavia so I saw that if you get out

28:48

on the global scale it's please it to

28:51

the market is the global market is big

28:53

but there was no cases in Sweden that

28:56

showed it so and that's also

28:59

one of the success factors going global

29:01

from the beginning yes when people tell

29:05

me that they're gonna go into German in

29:07

two years I love because the the

29:09

different I wait why do you laugh that

29:13

now we launched in 24 hours we launched

29:17

18 countries or maybe it was 22 but we

29:20

shipped 22 countries in 24 hours and

29:23

it's not difference no difference to

29:26

make the business in Spain or in Sweden

29:31

or EU Norway is a difference but of

29:37

course there is different challenges but

29:40

for me business is when you ship a

29:42

product to a store and it sells out

29:44

everything all administration and all

29:47

that fucking legal bullshit can always

29:49

be done there is hundreds of I mean it's

29:51

13 in a dozen of people who can have

29:55

that knowledge because all companies

29:57

that is global are using these kind of

30:00

people or companies but going to one

30:04

store to another so I saw it I didn't I

30:07

saw the word as our market and that of

30:12

course if we would have said like okay

30:15

we're gonna start in Sweden then you're

30:17

putting your prices in the perspective

30:19

of Sweden because then you're starting

30:22

with like how much is this the costing

30:24

and you say if we sell it for its twenty

30:28

five and we sell it for 50 then we're

30:31

good but then you're getting now we're

30:33

going to enter in Germany oh we need the

30:36

distributor he wants a 30 percent on top

30:39

and that changes the whole competition

30:41

so it's a different what we did this

30:44

like we looked at the market globally

30:46

and structured it globally from the

30:49

beginning and then we launched in the

30:52

different ways and then we were I mean

30:54

you have influencers like Valtor that

30:59

has a global recognition and aspect and

31:04

and you can launch together with so it's

31:06

not harder to launch in Sweden than it

31:09

is in Italy if you're having the right

31:10

product if you have the right brand in

31:12

the right product

31:12

that's that the rest will the rest will

31:16

be attractive problem somehow when I

31:18

always structured my companies and so on

31:21

I I look at the political field I look

31:24

at the technology field what is the big

31:26

things that is changing our consumer

31:29

behavior and it's actually you know

31:31

change of technology you know and the

31:35

phone became became a computer that was

31:38

mobile and then you needed headphones I

31:40

I have this story that I tell sometimes

31:42

when I

31:43

I sometimes lecture about branding and I

31:45

teach about branding and stuff and I

31:46

have this story I tell that I attribute

31:48

to you I know I'm not entirely sure if

31:51

this is made up or if it's actually

31:53

drawers it's true I might have made it

31:56

up some way along the way but I think

31:58

it's a great story how you saw that this

32:01

product will obviously when people say

32:03

that see that this project product will

32:05

do well they will obviously copy it so I

32:09

will create the copy myself and brand it

32:11

as coalesce true yeah so the story was

32:14

that we launched urban ears and the cool

32:18

out but at that time cool out was a

32:20

brand that was like a unprinted t-shirt

32:23

so we made a headphone that we could

32:25

print with anything and i went to my

32:27

friend at H&M; and I was like what what

32:30

products are selling best in your stores

32:32

like is it

32:33

Hello Kitty Betty Boop etc and I signed

32:36

these ones were free globally for for

32:41

headphones the category headphones so I

32:44

signed up of all this so cool loud was

32:46

in the beginning kind of a children's

32:50

headphone so we had Star Wars Betty Boop

32:53

Marvel Hello Kitty spongebob etc when we

32:58

launched urban ears that was the one who

33:01

really took off in the beginning and it

33:04

was about monochrome colors so I I knew

33:10

from my experience with other brands

33:12

that when you starting to go up someone

33:14

would copy and they will have a big

33:15

distribution net and they will change

33:17

the pricing and it will take a lot of

33:19

the of the market share so I was reading

33:23

the often blow that again that is my big

33:25

inspiration

33:26

I don't read books we will send an

33:30

invoice but they attach time spike

33:37

Matt's really got really fast really

33:40

fast

33:41

it was the year's Christmas present I

33:45

thought of this poor guy who came up

33:48

with the idea and made the whole concept

33:50

and then some other people who took it

33:54

and benefit from it so one product was

33:57

sold in this place like a stadium and

33:59

next one was in life and the third one

34:02

was a drifter or something

34:04

and I'm like shit poor guy but what

34:07

about the V would have copied himself he

34:09

has doing different brands and supplied

34:11

the whole market because if he's having

34:14

bigger volumes he can compete on price

34:16

and they he already had a customer so

34:19

usually his customers tells him if you

34:22

sell to these we will not buy it and he

34:25

can't sell the whole supply because then

34:28

it's gonna be a price war so what I did

34:31

this that I copied myself and people

34:34

thought I was fuckin crazy

34:36

people always applauded when I yeah this

34:38

story but it's very true so I said like

34:42

we're gonna copy ourselves and you know

34:43

what I think we sold of them we made our

34:47

own line then a cloud we call it cloud

34:50

colors and I think we sold close to 5

34:53

million products out of these 20

34:55

millions that way that could be wrong

34:57

but it was a huge success of copying

34:59

ours that Allah made that's that story

35:01

is deserves more attention because

35:03

that's fucking brilliant I think more

35:06

brilliantly is that you now gonna see me

35:08

open a new one of the things is that we

35:23

wanted to to make our episodes more even

35:27

more fun and I think I think next time

35:30

we will have different feedback that

35:32

would not be the main that about even

35:34

more

35:35

[Music]

35:36

are you enjoying yourself Cory I love it

35:39

yeah thank you I think we're doing good

35:42

I have a you know when do the real show

35:50

no but when I talk I think over here so

35:55

sometimes I don't explain so yeah if you

35:57

don't understand you have to ask I guess

35:59

I'm the same a little bit yeah maybe you

36:01

have a good shrink for me you have a

36:03

good therapist I'm starting to realize I

36:05

have a bunch of my best therapists is

36:08

actually music okay I have that and then

36:12

my second best therapist is five people

36:17

why choose one why do you need and and

36:20

then you go through different problems

36:22

and you talk to different people I I can

36:25

only do one because I didn't by sound

36:27

stock finally the wine finally yeah I

36:39

mean the not so is it that the same as a

36:43

core August

36:44

no no ecological can still be with

36:48

different stuff it can be are you

36:52

reading the script I'm done half a page

36:59

now it did all the dirty talking while

37:01

you were going on so no yeah it's much

37:05

better actually yeah oh the otherwise

37:08

the other one yes everything is good

37:10

everything mean the not to go somehow it

37:14

all gets better and better yeah part two

37:17

part two tell us about being fired well

37:22

it's actually not the first time why am

37:26

I not snow but you know I'm not easy to

37:29

work with I can admit that and I have

37:35

some kind of bad humor so sometimes a

37:37

fuck people at least on purpose as well

37:39

but you know one of my biggest talents

37:44

is that I understand feelings and that

37:46

is how I build brands and that is how I

37:48

actually

37:49

creating trends and then I can get a

37:54

little over whelmed overwhelmed to the

38:01

people overwhelming so I got fired which

38:09

for me was pretty sad in one way at the

38:14

same time I had done it for ten years so

38:16

I started to look I started to look for

38:19

an exit like eight years ago but now I

38:25

this time I tried to buy it back the

38:28

company but my story there is always two

38:31

sides of the coin as well but my story

38:33

is that they wouldn't sell it because it

38:36

was me they wanted they understood that

38:38

I probably III mean I already proved

38:41

them wrong so many times for example

38:44

when we were starting to do speakers I

38:46

had to do it behind it in the end I

38:49

showed it to them no one understood it

38:51

and they said like we should focus on

38:53

headphones and I said like well it's not

38:57

about that you know now everybody has

38:59

their thing in their in their smartphone

39:02

so when they coming home they don't want

39:04

to use their old stereo so we should

39:07

have something that they connect us

39:08

easily with their smartphone because

39:10

that is the remote control of their life

39:14

so they play it because they don't want

39:16

to buy the CDs from there but at that

39:21

time I couldn't explain it that way so

39:22

they like why the fuck are we gonna do

39:24

speakers right oh and you did it anyway

39:28

sorry 70% of the business today yeah

39:31

that's so it was a good thing that I did

39:34

I mean so that that was one thing and I

39:36

think the the the wireless revolution

39:39

was so I mean when I when I made up this

39:42

house from scratch I ran speaker cables

39:47

throughout the entire house that we were

39:55

probably the last generation to do that

39:58

but do you know what I did as well I did

40:01

cat6 to all room

40:04

that is a good idea though yes that's a

40:06

little bad idea that is gonna go away is

40:10

I mean now you can do like chromecast

40:13

and all that I don't even have a

40:15

television but III I knew a 2010 I think

40:21

I put in like 20 kilometers of cat6 in

40:25

my house what what is the cat's it's a

40:27

Ethernet cable network cable oh that and

40:30

that I still think that's fine III won't

40:32

I won't hold that against you but the

40:36

wireless thing I did it that was fuckin

40:38

stupid but you did it and you were in

40:39

the industry you should have known

40:41

better

40:42

well where's your wine what's in the

40:48

fridge

40:48

so I need to be the structural person

40:53

here obviously so we got the home page

40:56

so five pages so ya doing good so you're

40:58

actually on time someone said depends on

41:02

what so you got why did you get fired

41:09

you got fired because you had different

41:11

ideas of the future of the company well

41:14

yes because you try to buy his basically

41:17

it's basically I wanted out I didn't

41:20

feel good I didn't feel that they were

41:22

listening to my ideas I didn't feel that

41:27

they were moving quickly I felt that the

41:32

company was built on a bigger ground to

41:35

have better success even I mean it's not

41:37

bad when you grow him with 30 40 percent

41:40

organically and so on I just wanted you

41:43

know if if sound have their products

41:47

here and we have Marshall adidas in

41:49

urban ears and we're doing 200 million

41:51

dollars and then you put beats on the

41:54

other corner who started about the same

41:56

time and they do 4.5 billion like what

42:01

the fuck you know let's go in and take

42:03

this bikes you know we're winning over

42:05

them in tests we have a better product

42:06

we have cool names everybody doesn't

42:08

like hip hop even if a lot do they can

42:12

buy urban ears but there is also a big

42:14

rock segment and we should take that and

42:17

they my former partners thought that it

42:24

was good enough and I'm not the person

42:27

that is good enough I'm more of a

42:30

personal in so I'm not saying that they

42:32

are wrong I'm just saying that I have

42:35

some bigger ambitions and I had some big

42:38

Aryan beliefs in what I had built and I

42:41

it's isn't it lovely with the kind of

42:43

ambition where you build a company in

42:46

ten years to two hundred million dollars

42:49

and you say that could be two billion

42:52

that could be two billion it's not good

42:54

enough yeah no but no but you know you

42:59

don't find these IDs they're not growing

43:01

on the tree I mean a lot of people are

43:04

trying and out there but we did and I

43:10

remember in 2014 when we were taking in

43:14

money to be safe we had a lot of cash in

43:16

the account and we didn't need to bring

43:19

in money but we were gonna do the smart

43:20

phone and we said like we can challenge

43:24

the EBT a with a new product that is

43:27

either gonna take us to the sky or be

43:31

difficult to move but it will not kill

43:34

us the Marshall phone did not fly even

43:39

if the Marshall brand with headphones

43:42

and speakers thought it started to sell

43:43

out because people thought it was

43:46

fucking cool that someone did the smart

43:49

phone and it was the watch best music

43:51

phone so it's it's sad in one way but

43:55

I'm so happy that I got out but it was

43:59

not feeling well this summer I mean that

44:01

was a lot of IDs and thinking and

44:05

regrets and stuff but now I'm back I say

44:10

that you should you know you can't

44:12

change your history you can change your

44:15

future but don't pay attention to your

44:20

history you keep it in there but try not

44:23

to make the same mistakes because

44:24

mistakes are gonna be made but don't

44:28

stop believing in yourself should we

44:31

talk a little bit about extra new

44:33

project and that's an amazing one I I

44:35

for one I love the ocean I've always

44:37

been on the ocean I just this year

44:41

actually got my commercial license to

44:43

drive commercial boats if everything if

44:45

this podcast fails I can always be a

44:47

boat taxi driver the interesting thing

44:50

is here is really did you invest in X

44:53

sure yet well I can't afford it now

44:55

either because now I have this new

44:56

company to finance and fund but but yeah

44:59

well we'll see but anyway I love the

45:02

ocean

45:03

I love electric vehicles I drive an

45:06

electric car this is I love this project

45:10

as you know because I'm all over you on

45:12

LinkedIn and everywhere yeah so tell us

45:14

about the project I also had a very big

45:17

deep understanding of the sea you know

45:20

my family agree my family grave is on

45:24

the island you you Gordon and my

45:28

grandma's house is in in a small

45:31

fisherman's village

45:32

I don't feel home if I'm not close to

45:34

the sea and these boats idea actually

45:39

came up in 1996 but at that time it was

45:44

a bad idea so I'm glad I didn't went

45:46

through it but in 2012 when Tesla was

45:50

really making in noise I felt like yeah

45:54

boats is actually a better idea because

45:58

on a boat trip II always having these

46:00

fumes on in one way or another when you

46:05

get the fumes in the car it's not the

46:11

divorce you're getting a letter from the

46:15

lawyer that are you trying you try to

46:17

kill your kids and it's not very good

46:21

so but in the on the boat trip you

46:24

always get the fumes inside then no one

46:26

says anything about it but it's not a

46:29

very nice experience especially when you

46:31

are in that environment that you're

46:33

there to be calm and hearing the water

46:35

sound and that is the second thing that

46:38

when you have a fossil fuel engine

46:41

you're always

46:43

having this big noise and you can talk

46:46

to each other but can you imagine

46:48

sailing without wind were you just

46:52

hearing the water breaking against the

46:55

hull it's kind of a soulful sound after

46:59

this summer I I also have a fossil fuel

47:03

both in Palma and when I Drive it I'm

47:07

getting angry before I was getting here

47:09

I thought it was beautiful to go out on

47:11

the sea even if it was loud but now when

47:14

I experience something that is totally

47:16

silent it's only the water breaking that

47:18

is also a pretty big noise but you can

47:21

still talk to each other in normal voice

47:23

then I'm getting angry when I'm taking

47:25

my well craft and what's the what's the

47:28

outcome for this so this is your

47:30

full-time project right now well I work

47:33

also with the environment in different

47:37

ways you know why I built a house where

47:39

we are self supplied on on on food and

47:42

so in a good year we can make up to two

47:46

tons of food but we only three people so

47:49

everything I planted you can eat I work

47:52

for the UN as an innovation ambassador I

47:55

have some new projects that I'm looking

47:58

into in this kind of area but the most

48:01

importance is extra and why I'm doing

48:05

that is that off the sound you know our

48:08

ID when it comes to being good and and

48:11

when environmentally friendly was that

48:14

you were gonna take a headphone and

48:16

throw it out and to the wilds and when

48:19

you came back it was gonna be growing a

48:21

tree so was like a seed inside that was

48:25

the sound tree that was not so important

48:28

to some of my older colleagues but now

48:32

when I'm out and I got my cash I can

48:37

actually change that and and do

48:39

something good and I believe that you

48:42

cannot give away money you have to the

48:46

whole system the whole social system is

48:48

made of making money that is in the

48:52

roots for modern life so but what you

48:56

can do is that

48:57

doing good at the same time as he's

48:58

doing busy business and that is much

49:01

more efficient so I think that there is

49:04

IDs and people are more welcome to this

49:08

kind of companies that is doing good at

49:09

the same time I believe that you need to

49:12

build companies that is doing good for a

49:15

modern lifestyle and before you had to

49:20

take more payment and in some occasions

49:22

you need to do that as well in our case

49:24

you know technology is very expensive in

49:27

the beginning but that doesn't mean that

49:29

we were actually targeting a different

49:32

price level to reach new consumers that

49:37

can go out on the water in their in

49:39

their I want to build falling swag and

49:42

of the sea and that is gonna take time

49:45

but that is right now we're a very

49:47

luxury product even if the product is

49:50

amazing we're doing hydrodynamics with

49:54

the Rolls Royce and we're building like

49:57

the best Swiss electric engine and we're

50:01

building this batteries that is from the

50:04

Swedish army supplier that is where we

50:07

need to be now but in the future we can

50:11

definitely our ambition is to come much

50:16

lower in the price and get more people

50:18

on the water and that also means like

50:20

self-driving boats that people are

50:23

scared of who can who haven't been on

50:26

the water but being on the way if we can

50:28

get more people on the water we can

50:31

definitely change the world and get them

50:33

more relaxed in a better peaceful mind

50:36

how much does it cost what's the price

50:38

range where does it start and where does

50:41

it end well we basically put in

50:44

everything because we're going to the

50:46

luxury segment right now and it's about

50:50

three million Swedish crowns 240,000

50:54

euros without via tea but you have no

50:58

more or less no maintenance of the of

51:01

the engine the more you drive of course

51:05

the more you make the money so we have a

51:07

gasoline calculator so if you're driving

51:10

a lot

51:11

you actually will make more but the big

51:14

thing again there is a lot of the best

51:17

beaches and stuff is getting banned of

51:20

fossil engines the nicest lakes are

51:23

stopping fossil fossil beyond burning

51:27

boats and with this you can enjoy it in

51:31

a different way so and again the

51:33

experience of having total silence and

51:37

the colors that were using that you

51:39

become one with nature is just amazing

51:41

it was more than I dreamed

51:43

dream loved the whole boat word is about

51:47

local brands and there is lots of nice

51:53

boats around but there is no one who's

51:55

going around to each Boat Show in the

51:58

world globally and showing a concept so

52:01

already is electronic you know so we

52:04

have a different perspective to all the

52:07

others and using the best technology

52:08

with the bay you know being sustainable

52:11

materials etc to make a very small

52:14

footprint and then having a very cool

52:18

traditional design functional as all

52:21

Swedish are and then as a second step

52:24

when we're starting to get that together

52:27

we're gonna drive volumes and come down

52:30

in price by being more of a car

52:33

manufacturer

52:34

right now we are boutique manufacture we

52:37

can build a hundred boats this year

52:39

that's maximum I don't know if we're

52:42

gonna be able to do that but Tesla sold

52:45

two three hundred thousand cars on

52:48

internet and we are putting a lot of

52:53

sweat and blood into our boat

52:55

construction site so I think that we

52:58

definitely can sell more than 50 boats

53:01

next year is going to be different then

53:03

we're going to push volumes and we it's

53:06

going to be more affordable but you know

53:08

it always starts off with a different

53:12

price and that's how we have to play it

53:15

but your plan is to sell a shit I want

53:19

to sell millions of boats and this is

53:21

not only because of the money in the

53:23

and the my fame that it would do but I

53:26

mean electric boats are not new it's

53:29

been from the 1850s in the English

53:32

Channel all boats in the eighteen mid

53:35

eighteen hundreds were electric and now

53:38

it's a lot of fishing boats and that

53:41

kind of products that you don't need to

53:43

go so quick our idea is that you should

53:46

have it from modern life that you should

53:48

go fast in the distance and by fast I'm

53:53

not talking about the 80 knots but maybe

53:55

25 knots normal cruising speed cruising

54:00

speed exactly so we I see ourselves as

54:03

kind of the SUV of the sea so we're not

54:09

we're not the Ferrari we're more like a

54:11

Land Rover and we have a very enjoyable

54:17

ride when it comes both to functionality

54:20

and then you look good when you're

54:22

coming into Harbor which i think is

54:24

important it is I have a you know as we

54:30

talked about I think your marketing

54:32

you're you're my Yoda if I I'm Luke

54:37

Skywalker than me in marketing but there

54:43

are a bunch of things that I think are

54:44

interesting and we can't cover them all

54:45

but I think when I got to know you that

54:48

was 23 years ago and and and to be

54:50

honest I was not the best wakeboarder

54:52

around Irene oh but you had the you had

54:56

your not your face but you had your you

55:02

had your style and you also you fit in

55:08

to the puzzle you played your part

55:10

because everybody don't like everybody

55:13

that is with marketing and that's why I

55:15

do multi brands but it's also if you

55:18

have one product that you're gonna you

55:22

can't have them all the same you need to

55:24

have different people because it will

55:27

recognize other consumers right and you

55:30

filled one part of it right so and and

55:33

in a way what you were very early with

55:35

was some sort of in

55:37

fluency marketing there was a type of

55:39

influence or marketing that you were

55:40

doing you're pretty yes the other this

55:42

group of people this was before the

55:44

internet this was before but they were

55:47

different I mean each person that put in

55:49

had the purpose to reach different

55:52

audience

55:53

there were other people who was doing

55:56

you know very very initial specific

55:58

within the genre that they were in but I

56:02

always tried to look at like you know I

56:05

can sell five boards with this guy or

56:08

500 with this guy and 500 with that and

56:11

writing that all together

56:12

you were massive but if you would have

56:15

had all you know from that area you

56:19

don't get out that way right and and to

56:23

me I think that's even today it carries

56:25

a lot of relevance yes it's still true

56:27

you know and do you think that way when

56:29

you look at influencers for I mean for

56:32

sound

56:32

I guess influences would be obvious but

56:35

for extra as well maybe or how do you

56:37

think about that what would actual

56:40

there's two ways there is of course the

56:43

people who always who's already have a

56:47

big position when it comes to saving the

56:49

oceans but we also look at more

56:53

importantly for me is to change people

56:56

who's not having that in the daily

56:59

agenda you know that thing that other

57:02

watches are gonna the oceans are gonna

57:04

be fine I don't care you know that is if

57:06

I can get one of these guys over to

57:09

extra then it's a win yeah so and even a

57:16

bigger win yeah with Tesla Tesla has

57:18

always said that we we are gonna make

57:20

them this is gonna be as fun as you can

57:23

have fun time as you can have in a car

57:24

yeah they were never about saving the

57:27

globe you know I think but they were

57:31

they are they are stories not there but

57:34

they I think that that bullshit we can

57:38

just say but it's not gonna work

57:42

people still that's what I calling like

57:45

the modern life or going back to the

57:47

caves if they came out with the electric

57:49

car that was

57:51

30 kilometers and it took 15 seconds

57:54

they need to be better as well you know

57:56

no one would have buy it they would not

57:58

think that's my point that's my point

58:00

exactly

58:01

it's a better product it's a better

58:03

product you have to be better but it's

58:06

same time sustainable then it's a

58:08

win-win in the in the consumers mind the

58:12

big decisions you have to take is

58:14

sometimes with yourself how to be and do

58:20

to make that deal happen sometimes it

58:24

has to do with your relationships with

58:27

people that you're working with or

58:28

people that is your partners or people

58:31

that is your friends it's it's just

58:33

things is I think that everybody who

58:37

gets into the an entrepreneur thing has

58:40

to be more a little bit more self

58:44

thinking about themselves and self is

58:48

the company because that is what you

58:50

starting on what you driving so you

58:52

can't go out and have a beer on Friday

58:54

nice nights you need to be home and work

58:58

because you have a deadline it's not

59:00

like you know when you're at work we

59:04

have a paycheck you don't challenge

59:06

somebody you can lose so much when

59:09

you're doing your own company is fucking

59:11

one to a hundred

59:13

yeah 24/7 actually I think not even you

59:16

I don't think anyone's basically had me

59:18

we were not never really employed you

59:21

were for a while at we are see I think

59:22

and I was for a while at some other

59:24

agency and you were for a while today

59:26

JCB we've pretty much not been employed

59:28

and I for less I think one very big

59:33

thing as you're saying is I mean if I

59:36

look at my buckets of time so I often

59:38

look at my time and I say okay this is

59:41

how much I'm putting into what's in the

59:43

water this is how much I'm putting into

59:45

my agency this is how much I'm putting

59:47

into my book projects then when this

59:50

adds up it has never been a 40-hour Work

59:53

Week

59:54

now before I worked all the time and I

59:56

work all the time now as well I

59:59

definitely did take my time to relax now

60:02

because I prioritize

60:05

my health because that is how I'm gonna

60:08

be successful over years if you're

60:10

getting a heart attack or you're getting

60:12

a bad disease because you're not taking

60:16

care of yourself is going to finish you

60:19

before the finish line I'm actually

60:21

putting three hours a day to myself and

60:25

that is about making the best food doing

60:28

meditation doing my training and just

60:32

thinking of you know how happy I am to

60:35

actually be here and and being in this

60:38

world might sound silly but for me it

60:42

has and you would never ever see me say

60:46

this 20 years ago when I was young and

60:48

cool but what I mean with age it has

60:52

changed my mind and I feel better than

60:55

ever and I feel stronger than ever you

60:59

look very strong I can tell from your

61:01

biceps over from yeah I train hard and

61:05

I've worked hard you know I was probably

61:09

drunk for around 25 years and at that

61:12

time I counted as a long time to be

61:14

drunk well it was fun it was a hell of a

61:18

fun and it was some you know when you

61:21

are in that mood and that way of course

61:24

you are running from something and my

61:31

biggest challenge has maybe been to

61:36

challenge myself and see the truth in in

61:40

some of my personal problems and I think

61:44

that I'm coming out much stronger on the

61:46

other side but having been a hell of a

61:49

trip for here I've been to hell many

61:52

times the past year in different ways

61:56

this is one of the portion and I think

61:59

that has been very successful to myself

62:01

I never go and look back but I plan

62:06

people don't see me so much for strategy

62:09

and so on and you know strategy strategy

62:12

for some people can be that you you know

62:15

I'm gonna take him out I'm gonna do that

62:18

I'm not looking at that way but I plan

62:21

the big plan what does this company

62:23

gonna be in five years and then I write

62:26

it down especially the next year's the

62:30

second year is gonna be more like a

62:35

shadow in five years it's going to be a

62:37

dream like where one do I want what

62:40

happens next year yes and next year is

62:43

it's very easy because then you look

62:45

back the year that you have been in and

62:47

and you see like this is what I need to

62:50

change did this was really good this is

62:52

what I need to push even more and this

62:55

is what I need to really challenge and

62:58

this is what I really need to lock down

63:01

and I've write that in my in my

63:05

Christmas break

63:06

and then I don't look at it because I

63:09

remember but it's in my back of the mind

63:11

and I actually without notice working

63:14

against that kind of structure and goals

63:17

that I set so I know that you have a

63:21

supercar of a mind in a way I have a

63:24

friend of mine went to his therapist and

63:27

and this therapist said that okay so

63:29

this is this is the problem you have a

63:30

supercar mind you don't know how to

63:32

drive it and sometimes I don't want to

63:35

say I have a supercar mind but sometimes

63:36

I feel that way myself I have problems

63:38

kind of steering this engine and in the

63:42

right direction and that kind of thing

63:44

and and I I have a feeling that you can

63:47

relate to that a little bit maybe yes

63:49

it's very easy am i a supercar mind was

63:53

my biggest regret and that put me into

63:57

trouble the most when I was young but I

64:00

had a father and mom that believed in me

64:04

and I could do all the things and they

64:07

didn't have the money to supply me but I

64:10

did more things good than bad so I was

64:13

on the positive cash flow when I got

64:16

older I could structure in one way maybe

64:20

some diagnosis because that is

64:22

superpower size as I say it and use that

64:26

to my I could start to control it when I

64:30

was younger it

64:31

into troubles when I'm getting older I'm

64:35

not saying that I'm not getting into

64:36

troubles but you know I'm living after a

64:40

pace that is that I want to control it

64:43

and use it in in a good way to make

64:46

things better and I think that is a life

64:51

journey and you know there is old things

64:56

that people say that you know with the

64:58

age comes wisdom I didn't I I thought it

65:02

was crap when I was young but in some

65:05

ways it does but you still have to be

65:07

very young in your mind survive these

65:09

days in in in the company business

65:12

that's a kind of wisdom - I think

65:14

staying young stay yes when you said we

65:18

knew each other for 23 years I thought

65:21

you were kidding because I didn't think

65:23

I was a day older than 23 you know I am

65:26

40 now we met when I was 17 but you know

65:30

this is that we've known each other for

65:32

more than half of my life

65:33

yeah but anyway thank you thank you for

65:37

the gift the big change was actually

65:40

when I was out in the restaurant this

65:44

guy comes up to me that was the most

65:47

powerful he had the budget for a lot of

65:51

companies then you had to pass him to

65:53

get to the cash and he helped me before

65:58

but he didn't really went all-in on me

66:01

but he was always there like this guy is

66:03

doing good jobs he put in smaller things

66:06

so I could survive then I went bankrupt

66:09

of the three years being on the job and

66:12

meeting this guy in the restaurant and

66:14

he's like hey Conrad Hawaii and I'm like

66:17

well I'm okay because I always like I'm

66:20

I'm perfect you know but at that time I

66:24

didn't feel so well because I was not

66:26

doing to the society it was I was meant

66:29

to be I was pushed down and I was not

66:32

believing in myself I was not other

66:35

people were not believing in me and he

66:37

said like Conrad remember one thing

66:40

after we talked

66:41

remember one thing

66:43

you have the knowledge and no one can

66:47

steal your knowledge and after that I

66:50

went home I was up for three nights and

66:53

days and wrote the business plan no

66:56

sound so that was the kick I needed in

66:59

the bath to actually start to believe in

67:02

myself

67:02

and walk home and and and start to

67:05

change the world

67:07

[Music]

67:10

so thank you so much for coming Conrad

67:13

and Cheers and thank you for all the

67:14

fantastic wine and we'll hope we'll talk

67:19

soon again

67:19

we sure luck with what's in the fridge

67:26

[Music]

67:37

great episode guys thank you thank you I

67:43

can have been there